Latest Publications

In Conversation: author Rachel Cartland on TVB Pearl

See Paper Tigress author Rachel Cartland talking on TVB Pearl and RTHK Channel 31 tomorrow night.

Time Out have written about the new Hong Kong interview show here.

Here’s the programme blurb:

Coming up on In Conversation tomorrow: the former civil servant who yesterday said Hong Kong has “the most ridiculous political system in the world.”

In Conversation with Rachel Cartland

“When I came here, it was an extraordinarily, genuinely, entrepreneurial place. There really were little people starting up and doing things completely off their own bat. But certainly now, I think we are seeing this issue that the big businessmen now are not innovative, that they are rent seekers.” – Rachel Cartland

This week Stephen Davies is “In Conversation” with former civil servant Rachel Cartland, who – last November – published a memoir of her time in the government.

Ms Cartland came to Hong Kong in 1972 at the age of just 22. She was fresh out of Oxford University and was one of the first two female expatriate administrative officers. It was, in some ways, very much an uphill struggle for a woman in those days, she tells host Stephen Davies, but she had always felt a certain sense of vocation.

“I actually imagined myself, dreamt of myself, in an office with papers. … it all came together like a magic potion, and I found myself doing the thing that I loved most in the world.”

For Executive Producer Gary Pollard and Stephen Davies, there was a reason to talk to Ms Cartland beyond the personal.

“In the forty years she was in the civil service,” says Gary Pollard, “Hong Kong went through massive changes, and civil servants were sometimes on the front line in dealing with them. One of the things we want to explore with this series is the individual as a witness to, and participant in, history.”

During Ms Cartland’s time in the civil service, Hong Kong’s administration evolved. Highlights of her career included opening a social services centre in the now-defunct Kowloon Walled City in 1973, seeing the new towns expand during the 1980s, and establishing the Arts Development Council.

During her career Hong Kong was governed by individuals such as Sir Murray Maclehose, Sir Philip Haddon-Cave (as an Administrator) Sir Edward Youde, Sir David Akers-Jones (as Acting Governor), Sir David Wilson, and Chris Patten. She also witnessed the transition of sovereignty in 1997, and the administrative problems we face now.

“I think it’s absolutely crucial for the question of democracy to be sorted out. I think that Hong Kong has become, I mean, people would say, “ungovernable”, she says “In Conversation”, adding that Hong Kong really does need a “Mandela moment”. But where or who might it come from?

Find out more in RTHK’s “In Conversation” on TVB Pearl, on Thursday 15th May at 7 p.m. Repeated on RTHK DTTV Channel 31 at 10.30 p.m. that same night, and at the same time the following Tuesday.

 

Book launch with egg tarts: No City for Slow Men

Author and blogger Jason Y. Ng has a knack for making the familiar both fascinating and funny. Three years after his bestselling début Hong Kong State of Mind, the razor-sharp observer returns with No City for Slow Men: a collection of 36 essays that examine some of the pressing social, cultural and political issues facing Hong Kong.

It’s not the only thing that’s new: Bookazine has opened its latest bookshop on Lyndhurst Terrace, right beside the Mid-Levels Escalator!

Come and help us celebrate both these events. Join us for wine, egg tarts and a booksigning from 2-4pm on Saturday April 12. Free of charge, all welcome.

Address: Bookazine, Lyndhurst Terrace, Central, Hong Kong. Enquiries: 2970 3999.

Tibet: Roads and Kingdoms

Roads and Kingdoms magazine has published an interview with Laurent Zylberman, photographer of our new book, Tibet, the Last Cry.

“Our stance is that the situation in Tibet is a fixation for many foreigners who know little about it,” he says. “It’s always been portrayed as a black and white situation, someplace where there is no middle road. The usual point of view is ‘bad red Han Chinese’ versus ‘cool yellow hat monks’. Editors want to see more guns and the army beating up monks. Or, they want a nice coffee table book with colorful pictures. Somehow our balanced view was not radical enough for them. That’s why we resorted to a crowd-funding scheme to finance the books.”

Read the full article.

Booksigning event, Nov 28: No City for Slow Men

Author and blogger Jason Y. Ng has a knack for making the familiar both fascinating and funny. Three years after his bestselling début HONG KONG State of Mind, the razor-sharp observer returns with a sequel that is bigger and every bit as poignant.

No City for Slow Men is a collection of 36 essays that examine some of the pressing social, cultural and existential issues facing Hong Kong. It takes us from the gravity-defying property market to the plunging depths of old age poverty, from the storied streets of Sheung Wan to the beckoning island of Cheung Chau, from the culture-shocked Western expat to the misunderstood Mainland Chinese and the disenfranchised foreign domestic worker. The result is a treatise on Hong Kong life that is thought-provoking, touching and immensely entertaining.

Join us on Thursday 28th November, 6.30-8.00pm, at Bookazine in Prince’s Building, Central, and get your signed copy!

Author and blogger Jason Y. Ng has a knack for making the familiar both fascinating and funny. Three years after his bestselling début HONG KONG State of Mind, the razor-sharp observer returns with a sequel that is bigger and every bit as poignant.

 

No City for Slow Men is a collection of 36 essays that examine some of the pressing social, cultural and existential issues facing Hong Kong. It takes us from the gravity-defying property market to the plunging depths of old age poverty, from the storied streets of Sheung Wan to the beckoning island of Cheung Chau, from the culture-shocked Western expat to the misunderstood Mainland Chinese and the disenfranchised foreign domestic worker. The result is a treatise on Hong Kong life that is thought-provoking, touching and immensely entertaining

Author and blogger Jason Y. Ng has a knack for making the familiar both fascinating and funny. Three years after his bestselling début HONG KONG State of Mind, the razor-sharp observer returns with a sequel that is bigger and every bit as poignant.

No City for Slow Men is a collection of 36 essays that examine some of the pressing social, cultural and existential issues facing Hong Kong. It takes us from the gravity-defying property market to the plunging depths of old age poverty, from the storied streets of Sheung Wan to the beckoning island of Cheung Chau, from the culture-shocked Western expat to the misunderstood Mainland Chinese and the disenfranchised foreign domestic worker. The result is a treatise on Hong Kong life that is thought-provoking, touching and immensely entertaining

Book launch event: Paper Tigress, Nov 21

Rachel Cartland came to Hong Kong in 1972 as one of just two female expatriates in the Hong Kong Government’s elite administrative grade.

Before she retired in 2006, her life was shaped by the momentous events that rocked Hong Kong during those action-packed years: corruption and the police mutiny, the growth of the new towns, the currency crisis of 1983, Tiananmen Square, the change of sovereignty and the devastation of SARS. The backdrop to her story ranges from Kowloon’s infamous Walled City to Government House to the rural New Territories.

Paper Tigress is full of humour and incident and, at the same time, an accessible account of modern Hong Kong and the forces that shaped it.

Join us for a glass of wine as we launch the book!

When: 6.30pm-8pm, Thursday November 21st
Where: Bookazine, 3/F Prince’s Building, Central, Hong Kong
More info: 2522 1785 or enquiries@bookazine.com.hk

John Hung is interviewed in Millionaire Asia magazine

 
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