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  • Getting Along with the Chinese

Getting Along with the Chinese: For Fun and Profit

$17.95

by Fred Schneiter

Are the Chinese really so inscrutable?

China Hand Fred Schneiter delves into the lighter side of Chinese psychology, and in doing so demystifies one of the toughest markets in the world. With an unfailing sense of humor, he offers insights for Sinophiles, Sinophobes and everyone in between. On the Hong Kong bestsellers list for twelve months, this book is now back in a new edition — the essential item to pack in your China survival kit.

“Everyone working with Chinese, in or out of China, should read this and send a copy to their boss.” — Daniel Ng, managing director, McDonald’s Hong Kong/South China

“Should be required reading for everyone setting out for China for the first time. Lighthearted and highly readable.” — Donald M. Anderson, president, US-China Business Council

Look inside this book!
Click on the following link to read pages from Getting Along with the Chinese. You will need a pdf reader to view this excerpt.

Prologue and Chapters 1 & 2

SKU: 978-988-13764-6-6 Categories: , Tags: , ,

Product Description

Are the Chinese really so inscrutable? China Hand Fred Schneiter delves into the lighter side of Chinese psychology, and in doing so demystifies one of the toughest markets in the world. With an unfailing sense of humor, he offers insights for Sinophiles, Sinophobes and everyone in between. On the Hong Kong bestsellers list for twelve months, this book is now back in a new edition — the essential item to pack in your China survival kit.

“A sensitive and humorous treatment of the similarities and differences between East and West… I learned a lot about both.” — Burton Levin, U.S. Ambassador

“Fred Schneiter knows the Chinese.” — China Business Review

Additional Information

Dimensions 140 x 216 mm
Pages

264

Binding

Paperback

Illustrations

black-and-white cartoons

About the author

Fred Schneiter starting writing in his late teens as an East Oregonian reporter, and went on to a University of Oregon Journalism degree while working as a University News Bureau reporter.

He worked for three more major West Coast newspapers before Korean War service in troop information and education, editing an amy paper during the occupation of Germany while freelancing a column in the US on the lighter side of army life. He’s won national awards in communication and management, lectured at Stanford, the University of Santa Clara and was a member of a small group of China Hands invited to testify on US-China trade on Capitol Hill shortly after China’s opening to the West.

Whetting an early appetite for adventure by riding freight trains across America from San Francisco during high school vacations, he’s lived and worked overseas for more than 30 years, covering more than 40 countries in the process, and every province of China. He was in Tiananmen Square the day the tanks moved in, lived in Hong Kong during its final years as a British colony, and witnessed first-hand modern China’s monumental rise after opening to the West.

Two decades into pseudo-retirement, the Schneiters live in the outskirts of Portland, Oregon, where he endorses the Ogden Nash view that progress has gone too far.