//Kitchen Tiles: A Collection of Salty, Wet Stories from the Bar-Rooms of Hong Kong

Kitchen Tiles: A Collection of Salty, Wet Stories from the Bar-Rooms of Hong Kong

$13.95

by Feng Chi-shun

The Cantonese call anyone lecherous, and anything salacious, harm sup — literally salty and wet. And the code word for all things harm sup is “kitchen tiles.” Anyone who has stepped into a Chinese kitchen knows it is like a war zone, with broth and condiments spilt all over the place; hence the tiles are deemed salty and wet.

Kitchen Tiles looks at the lascivious aspects of Hong Kong society. These 50 stories of gamblers, drinkers, masseuses and millionaires are based on the real-life experiences of Feng Chi-shun, author of Diamond Hill. Names and circumstances may have been changed, but the sentiment and spirit remain authentically Hong Kong.

Look inside this book

Click on the link to read pages from Kitchen Tiles. You will need a pdf reader to view these excerpts.

Contents

SKU: 978-988-13764-9-7 Category: Tags: ,

Description

The Cantonese call anyone lecherous, and anything salacious, harm sup — literally salty and wet. And the code word for all things harm sup is “kitchen tiles.” Anyone who has stepped into a Chinese kitchen knows it is like a war zone, with broth and condiments spilt all over the place; hence the tiles are deemed salty and wet. Kitchen Tiles looks at the lascivious aspects of Hong Kong society. These 50 stories of gamblers, drinkers, masseuses and millionaires are based on real-life experiences. Names and circumstances may have been changed, but the sentiment and spirit remain authentically Hong Kong.

Additional information

Dimensions 129 x 198 mm
Pages

196

Binding

Paperback

About the author

Feng Chi-shun is a naturalized US citizen, but considers Hong Kong — where he grew up and attended medical school — his home. His formative years were spent in Kowloon’s Diamond Hill district, where people were poor but life was rich.

Trained as a pathologist, he has published close to 100 scientific articles on his medical research. He has also been a columnist for the South China Morning Post, the leading English-language newspaper in Hong Kong.

Feeling deprived as a child, he is making up for lost time by living life to its fullest. He is an aficionado of wine and cigars, and a part-time punter attracted to roulette, poker, mahjong and horse racing. In his spare time, he plays golf and tennis, and shoots a mean game of pool. He intends to live in Hong Kong for the rest of his life.