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Hong Kong Volunteers in Battle: December 1941

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On the same day as the assault on Pearl Harbor, the Japanese army attacked the British Crown Colony of Hong Kong. Among the colony’s garrison were regiments from Britain, Canada and India as well as men from the Hong Kong Volunteer Defence Corps, better known as ‘The Volunteers’.

When the battle began on 8 December 1941, the HKVDC deployed a total fighting strength of 1,900 officers and men. These were mustered into seven infantry companies, five artillery batteries and a single armoured car platoon with a full range of support units.

Over the next 17 days, until the surrender on Christmas Day 1941, the men of ‘The Volunteers’ saw action all over Hong Kong. This is the story of their battle.

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SKU: 978-988-79638-4-4 Category: Tags: , ,

Description

On the same day as the assault on Pearl Harbor, the Japanese army attacked the British Crown Colony of Hong Kong. Among the colony’s garrison were regiments from Britain, Canada and India as well as men from the Hong Kong Volunteer Defence Corps, better known as ‘The Volunteers’.

When the battle began on 8 December 1941, the HKVDC deployed a total fighting strength of 1,900 officers and men. These were mustered into seven infantry companies, five artillery batteries and a single armoured car platoon with a full range of support units.

Over the next 17 days, until the surrender on Christmas Day 1941, the men of ‘The Volunteers’ saw action all over Hong Kong. This is the story of their battle.

Additional information

Weight400 g
Dimensions148 × 210 mm
Pages

144

Binding

Hardcover with jacket

Illustrations

8 maps

About the author

The writing of this book was started in prisoner-of-war camp, when commanders came together under the leadership of Major Evan Stewart to record their knowledge of the events, but was largely completed after the war.

Stewart taught at St Paul’s College in Hong Kong, and served in France during the First World War. He returned to Hong Kong to teach at St Paul’s College, becoming Headmaster in 1930.

During the Battle for Hong Kong he commanded the Eurasian HKVDC No 3 (Machine Gun) Company. After the capture of Wong Nei Chung Gap by the Japanese, he organised the escape of six survivors and, although wounded, he made his own way back alone through enemy lines. His actions resulted in the award of the DSO.