This memoir of a native son of a Kowloon-side squatter village – the first book ever on Diamond Hill, in either Chinese or English – is a revelation. Shocking in places, wistful in others, it presents the early days of a life shaped by a now-extinct community. Penned by a high-achieving Hong Kong professional, Feng Chi-shun’s sharp recollections of his humble upbringing make for marvellous reading.

In these fascinating, historically faithful pages, there’s warmth, humour, and an abundance of insights into a low-income Hong Kong neighbourhood that no longer exists – but remains close to the hearts of many who lived there. But this is not just Feng’s story. It’s also the story of a place once viewed with considerable trepidation by non-Chinese outsiders.

Diamond Hill will invite comparisons with Martin Booth’s 2004 hit Gweilo. If you enjoyed the latter, you will likely find the former similarly abso